<p>2014-16<br />
Offshore Garden</p>
<p>2014-16<br />
Offshore Garden</p>
<p>2014-16<br />
Offshore Garden</p>
<p>2014-16<br />
Offshore Garden</p>
<p>2014-16<br />
Offshore Garden</p>
<p>2014-16<br />
Offshore Garden</p>

Offshore garden is a swimming garden in the water, separated into 9 wooden platforms, set in the shallow waters anywhere around the world, or along the coast of Fukushima prefecture.

The shape of the platforms is based off the floorplan of the nuclear power plant Fukushima Daiichi that was damaged on 11 March 2011. The arrangement consists of several pergolas made of wood. They allow for algae to crop up the slats. All garden elements are easily accessible by swimming, each only 1,50 to 3,50 meters in length, stretched out on an area of 20 by 20 meters. In the gleaming sun the sea looks inviting for a swim to the near resting spot.

Japan's once wooden structured cities were time and again destroyed by fire hazards. Currently, the remaining traditional elements in the big cities are almost everywhere juxtaposed against the mass architecture of industrialization and surveillance. The modern architecture of thinkers like Tadao Ando or the Metabolists share characteristics of both, traditional and mass architecture. I took cue from that artistic practice for Offshore garden. The foundations of the useful, industrial power architecture of the catastrophe turn into an interpersonal playground and resting point for the Unconscious.