<p>2017<br />
Forensic Excavations Inventory</p>
<p>2017<br />
Forensic Excavations Inventory</p>
<p>2017<br />
Forensic Excavations Inventory</p>
<p>2017<br />
Forensic Excavations Inventory</p>

The complete Forensic Excavations Inventory consists of 145 family photos of three generations of descendents of survivors of the Armenian Genocide, in which Germany was considerably involved1, in the former Ottoman Empire. My grandmother, generation 1, my mother, generation 2 and I, generation 3. My great-grandmothers, generation 0, and other family members make guest appearances.
This collection of photos is, to my knowledge, the only one in the possession of this part of the family, everything else was given or thrown away. There are 6 types of photographs, I have classified them in category 1 to 6. Pictures of people in interiors and exteriors, portraits, photos of my newborn mother as well as interiors and exteriors without any people.

Each of these photos I deconstruct digitally and write something about every single item depicted in them. The textual description is a means for me to identify the extracted objects and subjects by their form ('TV set', 'wall') and make them discernible in a double sense: repetition and the nominal indication of the just seen opens an inbetween level that enables me to express something of the inexpressable and ambiguous.

The void that emerges not only through the extraction of the items but also through the not written and not remembered fulfills this task also, or should fulfill it.

The ''total deconstruction'' of these photos gives me the tool of a controlled, and constructed, telling of a story, with which I can examine the circumstances of my biography for its structures and foundations.
This narrative, the beginning of which I situate before my birth, does not make any claims of being complete, and does actualize where required, when I gain a new perspective on a photograph.

I was born in Sofia, in Bulgaria, and grew up, after the wall fell, in the former eastern part of Berlin. We weren't part of the Armenian community. The tradition of the double identity, the changed name under false pretences and the altered identity, even personality, does occur in our family structurally with regularity. The biographical interpretations and familiar circumstances are embedded in the photos and lie, before the deconstruction begins, hidden, because they are not yet labeled. One one hand the photos represent commonplaces ('children's birthday', 'christmas'), but on the other hand they also give some indication of
general interpretable and debatable markers: social class, origin, occupation, eating habits, trends, contemporary history, religion etc.2

1 cf. Juergen Gottschlich, 2015 2 cf. also Candida Huefers work 'Tuerken in Deutschland', Christian Borchardt, 'Familienportraets', Herlinde Koelbl, 'Das Deutsche Wohnzimmer'

English version of this work will be developed simultanously.

photo of installation view: Alexander Pannier

compare also the work Magic City